Upcoming invited talks this spring 2013

I have been invited to present work at several interesting and recommended events in the field of enactive or embodied cogntive science this spring:

April 3-5, Methods in studying social cognition, Heinrich-Heine Universität, Düsseldorf

April 19, Enactive Architecture & Vacancy Studies, Architecture Academy, Amsterdam

April 22, End of year talk, Neurophenomenology & Architecture, University of Toronto

April 26, Merleau-Ponty Symposium (in Dutch), University of Amsterdam

May 6, Affordances & Sense of Space, Het Huis, Utrecht, organized by theater maker Boukje Schweigman.

June 6-7, Intersubjectivity as Interaction – In the footsteps of Merleau-Ponty, RU Nijmegen (read my abstract HyperAffordanceGrip here).

June 17-19, The Reach of Radical Embodied or Enactive Cognition, Antwerp Univerisity (contributed talk, read my abstract ‘Skilled Intentionality for “Higher” Cognition’ here).

MPInteractionNijmegen

Three new publications on enactive embodied cognition

Here are three important new publications showing the potential of understanding enactive or embodied cognition in terms of skillful responsiveness to a field of affordances or ‘skilled intentionality’. This series of papers shows how to think of this at the phenomenological, psychological, and neural levels of analysis, and, crucially, how my notion of ‘responsiveness to a field of affordances’ makes it possible to relate insights gained at these different levels.

Kiverstein, J. & Rietveld, E. (2012), Dealing with context through action-oriented predictive processing. Frontiers in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 3 (421), pp. 1-2.

Rietveld, E. (2012), Bodily intentionality and social affordances in context, in Paglieri, F. (ed.) Consciousness in Interaction. The Role of the Natural and Social Context in Shaping Consciousness. Amsterdam: J. Benjamins, pp. 207-226.

Rietveld, E., De Haan, S. & Denys, D (forthcoming), Social affordances in context: What is it that we are bodily responsive to? Invited commentary article on Leo Schilbach et al. BBS, Behavioral and Brain Sciences.